Jolly, Baron  “Franklin At The Court Of France, 1778.  Receiving the homage of his Genius, and the recognition of his Country’s advent among the Nations. ...”
Jolly, Baron  “Franklin At The Court Of France, 1778.  Receiving the homage of his Genius, and the recognition of his Country’s advent among the Nations. ...”
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Jolly, Baron “Franklin At The Court Of France, 1778. Receiving the homage of his Genius, and the recognition of his Country’s advent among the Nations. ...”

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Baron Jolly.  “Franklin At The Court Of France, 1778.  Receiving the homage of his Genius, and the recognition of his Country’s advent among the Nations.  This Engraving from the Original picture is respectfully dedicated to the People of the United States.” 

Philadelphia: William Jay, Charles J. Hendenberg, & William H. Emerson, 1853.  27 5/8 x 39 1/2.  Engraved in London by W.G. Geller.  Print backed with canvas on wooden stretcher.  Time toning in title area.  Full hand color.  Good condition.  Framed.  As is. A/A

A large, formal engraving of Benjamin Franklin at the Court of France in 1778.  Based on a painting by Baron Jolly from Brussels, the image shows Franklin surrounded by the gentlemen and ladies of Louis XVI’s court, with one of the ladies crowning Franklin with a laurel wreath.  The French court, the most elegant in the world, is shown off with its architectural and sartorial splendor, which contrasts to the simple Quaker style dress of Franklin.  The print symbolizes the “Genius” and “recognition of  [the United States’] advent among the Nations,” and it reflects the growing sense of stature by Americans in the middle of the nineteenth century.  This is one of the most attractive of the large historical prints issued in the mid-nineteenth century. 

Pick up in shop only due to size and weight.