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Antique Maps of regions of North America
from the 18th Century


[ Maps of the Western America | 19th century regional maps ]

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Lotter: PA, NJ & NY  1756+
Tobias Conrad Lotter. "Pensylvania Nova Jersey et Nova York Cum Regionibus Ad Fluvium Delaware In America Sitis, Nova Delineatione ob oculos posita per Tob. Conr. Lotter Geographum Aug. Vind." Augsburg: T.C. Lotter, 1756-1774. 22 x 20. Engraving. Light hand color. Strong impression. Although conserved it has light scattered stains, especially at bottom right corner. Else, good condition. Full margins.

A wonderful yet misunderstood map of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and southeastern New York, based upon Lewis Evans' map of 1749, one of the first and most important maps on the region. Evans mapping was the first really accurate and descriptive map of the mid-Atlantic regions to include good interior information. While this map has an almost humorous appearance, lending it a great visual appeal, it very closely copies Evans' information. The regions not mapped by Evans are inaccurate on Lotter's map, but the central part of the map directly reflects Evans' data, making this one of the most accurate portrayals of that area to the time. This German version, initially issued by Lotter's father-in-law, Matthew Seutter, shortly after the publication of Evans' map, would have had a great impact on the European conception of these British colonies, for Seutter and Lotter enjoyed a wider circulation than Evans. This map, then, illustrates the view many Europeans had of this important region at the beginning of the American Revolution.

Along with its cartographic importance, the map has a wonderful visual appeal. The elaborate rococo title cartouche in the upper left presents an idyllic picture of the New World, illustrating American flora and fauna and showing peaceful natives showing-off the fecundity of their world to a prosperous looking European. One of the most salient visual aspects of the map is its crude depiction of rivers and mountains. Adding to the appeal of the map is its obviously distorted picture of New England, squeezed into the available space so that the entire region, including Cape Cod, fit into an area narrower than New Jersey. This distortion is to achieve relative direction. Overall, this is a decorative and historic, though misunderstood, document worthy of any collection. Ref.: J.W. Docktor, "Seutter/Lotter Map of Pensylvania Nova Jersey et Nova York," The Portolan (Winter, 1993): 12-19. $2,200



Bellin New England 1762
Jacques N. Bellin. "Carte de la Nouvelle Angleterre, Nouvelle Yorck, et Pensilvanie." Engraving. Paris: J.N. Bellin, 1757. 8 x 11 1/2 (neat lines) plus full margins. Two tiny spots in image, else, very good condition. McCorkle, 757.1.

A well drawn map of the American northeast by Jacques Nicolas Bellin, the Hydrographer to the King of France. From about 1650 to 1750, the French dominated the cartographic world, with their fine, scientifically based maps, elegantly engraved and precisely detailed. Bellin (1703-72) was one of the best in the later period. This map shows the region from Delaware Bay to present-day Maine at the beginning of the French & Indian War. Topography is well presented, with rivers, lakes, and settlements clearly drawn. Of particular note are the indications of the forts that would play such an important role during the war, including Forts Niagara and Owego on Lake Erie, and in the strategic region between the Hudson and Lake Champlain, Forts George, Carillon, Edward, Lyduis, Anne, and Nicolson. Also of interest is the nascent road system. A major road runs along most of the coast, and several branches go inland, including one that lead to York in Pennsylvania and one that goes up the Hudson River to Albany and then up the Mohawk River. $375



"A Particular Map, to Illustrate Gen. Amherst's Expedition, to Montreal, with a Plan of the Town & Draught of ye Island." London, October 1760. From Gentleman's Magazine. 7 x 9. Engraving by J. Gibson. Very good condition.

Beginning in 1731, monthly news magazines made their appearance in Britain. These magazines, with such names as Gentleman's Magazine and London Magazine, contained poetry, prose and articles on events, fashions, personalities and other items of the day that might be of interest to the English gentleman. One of their most popular, and historically important, features was the inclusion of prints and maps to accompany their articles. During the French & Indian War these magazines issued a number of maps in response to the great interest in the turbulent events in North America. The British public would have been very concerned by the events of the war, and many publications would have carried accounts as word arrived by ships crossing the Atlantic. In order to put these events into a geographic context, the readers would also have wanted maps, such as this one, in order to follow the reports with better understanding.

This map illustrates the expedition led by General Lord Jeffrey Amherst against the French at Montreal in 1760, which led to the surrender of the city in September of that year. It shows the region along and south of the St. Lawrence River extending from Quebec to the Thousand Islands, and then around Lake Ontario and to the Niagara River. Forts, Indian tribes, rivers, portages and other such information is clearly presented. Also included are insets of Montreal Island and of the city itself, indicating its major streets, buildings and the surrounding fortifications. This map would have fascinated the eighteenth century reader separated from the events of the conflict by many miles. So too this map fascinates the modern reader similarly separated from the events, though by many years rather than miles. $275



Bellin: Boston
Jacques Nicolas Bellin. "Carte de la Baye de Baston [sic]." From Le Petit Atlas Maritime. Paris, 1764. 8 1/4 x 6 3/8. Engraving. Original hand color. Full margins. Small spot. Else excellent condition.

From about 1650 to 1750, the French dominated the cartographic world, with their fine, scientifically based maps. Jacques Nicolas Bellin (1703-72), Hydrographer to the King of France, was one of the best French cartographers of the later period. His specialty were marine and coastal maps and his famous Petit Atlas Maritime contained small but detailed charts of coasts and coastal cities around the world, including a series of fascinating American maps. $500

Bonne: Eastern US
Rigobert Bonne. "Les États Unis de l'Amérique Septentrionale, Partie Orientale." Paris, ca. 1770s. 13 1/2 x 9 1/4 plus full margins. No. 117 from an atlas. Engraving by André. Very good condition.

Rigobert Bonne (1727-95) was the Royal Hydrographer of France, so his primary interest was in marine charts. However, with his Royal connections and access to the cartographic documents in Paris, Bonne was able to compile maps containing some of the most up-to-date information of his time. This map is a good example of his work, including precisely drawn coastal profiles and details, and considerable inland information on orography, rivers, towns, and political boundaries. $250



Jefferys New England
Braddock Mead. [A Map of the most Inhabited part of New England,...]. [top two sheets only]. London: Thomas Jefferys, 1774. Engraving. Original hand and out line color. 20 1/2 x 38 1/4 (neat lines). Two of a total of four sheets joined. Right hand side of map faintly time toned. Else, very good condition. With inset at top left; "A Plan of the Town of Boston." Degrees of Latitude: 35; Stevens & Tree: 33(e).

The top half of a fascinating larger scale map of New England, whose copious and precise detail make it one of the finest map of the region ever issued. The map was drawn by Braddock Mead (aka John Green), an assistant to Thomas Jefferys, who through Jefferys had access to the latest general and specific maps available in London. Starting with the initial source of a 1753 map by William Douglas, and using quite a number of other sources as well, Braddock Mead produced a map that combined a wide scope with excellent topographical and political information. Such was its superiority and accuracy that it can be considered as the "Revolutionary War Map" of New England, used by both the British and the Americans during those hostilities, and it remained the prototype map of New England until the early nineteenth century.

Rivers, lakes, towns, townships, and roads are shown from the Gloucester, Massachusetts to present Kennebeck Bay, Maine. Of particular note is the indication of the dispute over the area that now constitutes Vermont, which was claimed by both New York and New Hampshire, a dispute that wasn't fully resolved until years later. $850



"An Exact Map of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland and Virginia from the latest Surveys." London: W. Russell, 1778. From The History of North America. 7 1/2 x 9 5/8. Engraving by J. Lodge. Strong impression cut close on top and left side.

A fine map issued in London during the Revolutionary war depicts the Mid-Atlantic region from New York City south to the Chesapeake Bay. The Allegheny Mountains are shown including southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, eastern Maryland and Virginia. Interestingly, the boundaries of Delaware are shown but the name does not appear on the map. $475



Russell: Midatlantic
William Russell. "An Exact Map of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland and Virginia from the latest Surveys." From The History of North America. London: W. Russell, 1778. 7 1/2 x 9 5/8. Engraving by J. Lodge. Hand color. Mat burn in margins. Else, very good condition.

A fine map issued in London during the Revolutionary war depicts the Mid-Atlantic region from New York City south to the Chesapeake Bay. The Allegheny Mountains are shown including southeastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, eastern Maryland and Virginia. Interestingly, the boundaries of Delaware are shown but the name does not appear on the map. $650



Russell: Quebec, New England & New York
"An Exact Map of the Province of Quebec with Part of New York & New England from the Latest Surveys." From W. Russell's History of North America. London: W. Russell, 1778.8 x 10 1/2. Engraving by J. Lodge. Excellent condition.

A very interesting map of the region that was the site of significant action during the American Revolution. The St. Lawrence River is shown from Montreal to the beginning of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, with Quebec situated astride its middle. To the south of the St. Lawrence, west of Nova Scotia, the "Territory of Sagadahock" is shown in what is today mostly Maine. Northern Vermont and New Hampshire are shown (identified here only as New England), as is the upper part of Lake Champlain. This area saw considerable activity during the war, including the expeditions against Quebec by Arnold and Montgomery and the British attacked down the Lake Champlain valley under Burgoyne. This region remained at the center of conflict between the Americans and Canadians for years, as the border of Maine and Canada wasn't finally settled until 1842. $350



Antonio Zatta. Venice: A. Zatta, 1778. 12 1/2 x 16 3/4. Engraving. Original outline color. Very good condition.

From Zatta's twelve sheet map of North America based upon Mitchell's multi-sheet map from the mid-eighteenth century. Mitchell's map was a seminal document in the history of the mapping of North America, and thus there was a great demand for its information. Zatta issued his version in order to help meet that demand, and like Mitchell's original, Zatta's map is filled with current, detailed, and fascinating cartography. The data was received from trappers, settlers, explorers, and soldiers who mostly traveled by water, and thus it is that the most accurate and detailed information is of lakes and rivers, and of the areas along their banks and shores. Zatta includes details of the locations of Indian tribes, settlements, trade routes, and frontier forts.



Desbarres: Delaware River
Joseph Frederick Wallet DesBarres. "A Chart of Delawar [sic] River from Bombay Hook to Ridley Creek, with soundings &c. taken by Lt. Knight of the Navy . . ." with a second panel entitled "A Plan of Delawar [sic] River from Chester to Philadelphia. Shewing the Situation of His Majesty's Ships &c on the 15th. Novr. 1777 surveyed and sounded by Lieutenant John Hunter of the Navy." Prepared for The Atlantic Neptune. London: Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, 1 June 1779. Etching. 30 1/4 x 21 7/8. Nebenzahl, 136. Sellers & VanEa, 1370; National Maritime Museum Cat.: 320: 130-31; Snyder, 85. This later and mostly complete state has the advantage of showing soundings plus shading to render topography and town plans.

After the French & Indian War, the job of surveying and mapping the American coastline fell upon J.F.W. DesBarres, who had commanded the mapping of the coasts of present-day eastern Canada. The resulting atlas, The Atlantic Neptune, was called by A.P. Loring, "the first great marine atlas of the eastern seaboard." Loring quotes Obadiah Rich who called it, "the most splendid collection of charts, plans and views ever published." This is an excellent example of the maps from this important atlas.

It is a chart of the Delaware River to as far as Philadelphia in two panels. As stated on the chart, it was "Composed and Published for the use of Pilotage by J.F.W. DesBarres Esqr," so the focus of detail is on the nature of the river itself. The coastline, mouths of creeks, shoals and sand bars, and soundings are shown with careful precision, and rhumb lines are used to help with navigation of a ship up this relatively narrow river. Inland information is sparse because it is limited to that which was visible sight from navigable waters. An occasional higher elevation is shown and a basic town plans for New Castle, Chester, and Philadelphia are present. Conventional symbols for swamps and waterways are shown for as much as a few miles inland in places. In the inset map showing from Chester to Philadelphia shows the situation of the British ships off Philadelphia in mid-November, 1777. $7,500



Bonne Mexico
Rigobert Bonne. "Le Nouveau Mexique." Paris, 1778. 8 x 12 1/4. Engraving by Dien. Very good condition. Lowery: 545.

Rigobert Bonne was the Royal Hydrographer of France, so his primary interest was in marine charts. However, with his Royal connections and access to the cartographic documents in Paris, Bonne was able to compile maps containing some of the most up-to-date information of his time. This map of the southern part of North America is a good example of his work. It shows as far north as Santa Fe and to just below Guadalahara, also including the northern tip of the Yucatan Peninsula. The southern coast of the United States in included to western Florida, and the river systems are included inland, especially for present-day Texas. A fine eighteenth century map of the region, with good early information of this American southwest. $325



Camden, SC Manuscript map 1794
John Barron, Surveyor for Rev. Thomas Adams. A plat map showing 227 acres adjoining the Ferry at Camden, South Carolina. Pen and watercolor. 2 May 1794. 12 3/4 x 7 3/4 (full sheet), Former folds in docket configuration. Conserved by deacidification and backing with archival tissue for strength. Old deterioration at compass center due to iron gall ink arrested.

The two tracts are east of the Wateree River, and a small lot with a house is next to the river but not within the acres defined as "A." Tract "A" contained 172 acres, and tract "B" is 55 3/4 acres. The surveyor's text states, "At the Request of the Reverend Thomas Adams I have Resurveyed the above tract of Land adjoining the Ferry at Camden and find it to contain 227 3/4 acres being, A 172 Acres and B 55 3/4 Acres. Camden 2d. May 1794. [Signed] Jno. Barron."

Methodist Thomas Adams (d. 1797), ordained at Boston's West Church in 1791 for service in Camden, Kershaw County, South Carolina, was the son of Amos Adams, pastor of the first church in Roxbury, Massachusetts. John Barron (1753-1841) was a member of a family prominent in York County, South Carolina. The house shown is possibly the ferry house, which was about 300 yards upstream from the current bridge for Interstate 20. $600



Isaac Weld Jr. "An Eye Sketch of the Falls of Niagara." From Travels through the states of North America...during 1795, 1796 and 1797. London: John Stockdale, 1798-99. Engraving. Ca. 6 3/4 x 9. With folds as issued. With some slight transferring, but very good condition.

One of a series of fine engraved maps of parts of North America from Weld's account of his travels through the continent in the last decade of the 18th century. So impressed was Weld with Niagara Falls that he had an entire chapter devoted to it and included three views and this map. An inset of the entire Niagara peninsula is included in the upper left corner. $110



Great Lakes
"A New Map of Upper & Lower Canada." From I. Weld Jr.'s Travels through the states of North America...during 1795, 1796 and 1797. London: J. Stockdale, 1798.6 3/4 x 9. Engraving. Very good condition.

A clear and interesting map of the Great Lakes issued near the end of the eighteenth century. The map was published in Isaac Weld's work describing his travels through the nation between 1795 and 1797. This map focuses on the Great Lakes region, showing as far north as James Bay. Details include the many rivers and lakes in the region, major settlements, and of particular interest, frontier forts including Forts George, Chambly, Niagara, and one located at the end of Green Bay. An early English map focusing just of the Great Lakes. $225




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