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Maps of Tennessee

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Southwest Territory
Joseph T. Scott. "S. W. Territory." From United States Gazetteer. Philadelphia: J. Scott, 1795. First state. 6 x 7 1/4. Engraving by J. Scott. Very light stain at fold; otherwise fine condition. Wheat & Brun: 651. Denver.

Only the second published map of Tennessee, issued in the first American gazetteer. Joseph T. Scott, a Philadelphia engraver and publisher, issued his gazetteer during the early days of American cartography, and the maps of the individual states and territories are very good. This map of the "South West Territory," is of particular note for it was only the second map of the region by itself and it was issued a year before Tennessee was admitted as the sixteenth state. Not much was known of this region in 1795, but Scott shows rivers, some topography, the settlements of Clarksville, Nashville, and Knoxville. Also depicted are Indian settlements, backwoods roads, and a boundary of the military reservation. This is the first state of Scott's map, which later had the title changed to "Tennassee." It is a most interesting and desirable map of the state. $650
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Benjamin Tanner after Daniel Smith. "A Map of the Tennassee Government formerly Part of North Carolina from the latest Surveys. 1795." From John Reid's The American Atlas. New York: John Reid, 1796.7 1/8 x 15 1/4. Engraving by B. Tanner. Narrow margins right and left side. Otherwise, very good condition. Wheat & Brun: 655. Wells, 5.

An important eighteenth-century, American made map of Tennessee. This map was issued in Reid's landmark American Atlas in 1796. The map was drawn and engraved by Benjamin Tanner, who was to go on to become one of the most important American cartographers of the early nineteenth century. This map is closely copied from General Daniel Smith's map first issued in 1794, the first and best American made map of Tennessee in the eighteenth century. The area depicted extends from the mouth of the Cumberland River to Muscle Shoals, and from the headwaters of the Tennessee River to the Mississippi. The information is quite accurate and neatly presented. The most prominent features are the rivers, with some orography indicated. Drawn in and labeled are Indian tribes and towns, roads, trails, and settlements such as Nashville, "Clerksville," and Knoxville. Also included is an indication of "Ross's Ironworks" well up the Holston River. A key in the lower left includes the indication for "Wedth of Rivers in Yards." For both its considerable accuracy and its very early date, this is a wonderful American document of Tennessee history. $1,850



Morse Kentucky & Tennessee
Cyrus Harris. "A Map of the State of Kentucky and the Tennessee Government Compiled from the Best Authorities." From Jedidiah Morse's The American Universal Geography. Boston: 1796. 7 5/8 x 11 1/2. With folds as issued. Engraving by Amos Doolittle. Wheat & Brun; 645. Remargined on left side, otherwise very good condition.

One of a series of late eighteenth century maps of various American states and territories. These maps are by Jedidiah Morse, one of the most influential of the early American cartographers. Some were originally drawn by other cartographers such as Osgood Carleton and J. Denison. Amos Doolittle, Benjamin Callender and Samuel Hill, the engravers, are some other of the most important names in early American printmaking. These maps are of considerable interest both because of the detailed information they provide on the United States at the end of the eighteenth century and because they are among the best examples of early American map making. $425



Carey: Tennessee 1800
Daniel Smith. "A Map of The Tennassee [sic] State formerly Part of North Carolina taken Chiefly from Surveys to Genl. D. Smith & others." At top: "Engraved for Careys American Edition of Guthrie's Geography improved." Philadelphia: M. Carey, 1800. 9 3/8 x 18 7/8. Engraving by Joseph T. Scott. Some soft creases. Overall, very good condition. Wheat & Brun: 653; state III.

An important map of Tennessee, a turn of the century edition of the first American made map of the territory. The map was issued by Mathew Carey, the first American cartographic publisher, and one of the seminal figures in early American cartography. This map was originally printed to accompany Daniel Smith's book on Tennessee (1793) beginning around 1794, and was also inserted in Carey's edition of Guthrie's Geography Improved up to 1800. Carey, an Irish immigrant, established the first American specialized cartographic publishing firm. He set up an elaborate cottage system of craftsmen for engraving, printing, and coloring his maps utilizing the best independent artists directed to a common end. Carey is important, then, not only for the excellent maps he produced, but for his setting the pattern for American map publishing, to be followed by the likes of John Melish and Henry S. Tanner.

This map shows Tennessee as it was just after it became a state. Carey's map was the first map of Tennessee to be based on actual surveys, mostly the work of General Daniel Smith. Smith was one of the Virginia members on the 1779-80 Virginia-North Carolina border commission. Shortly after this he moved to Tennessee, where he spent the remainder of his life. The map contains much interesting information. Rivers, mountains, wilderness "Public Roads," and the few white settlements in the territory are shown. Also shown are towns and lands of the native Americans. The second state of the map was the first to show the first eight counties in 1796, and this third state merely adds the engraved number "41" to the upper right corner outside the neat lines. Overall, a most desirable map of Tennessee interest. $2,400



Mathew Carey. "The State of Tennessee." Philadelphia: M. Carey, 1814. 9 5/8 x 20 1/2. Engraving. Original outline color. Full margins. A few light spots on centerfold. A small replaced section in bottom right corner, far from printed surface. Otherwise, very good condition.

Published just after the War of 1812, this map is from Carey's Atlas and it is an improved depiction of the state over the Smith map Carey had used in earlier versions. It shows the state at a very early date in its development, before the great flood of settlement of the later nineteenth century and at a time when much of the state was wilderness inhabited primarily by Indians. Rivers, towns, trails and roads are shown throughout, though development is quite sparse. The state is broken into twelve counties, with about half the state given over to Cherokee Territory. An attractive and significant map. $1,500



Mathew Carey. "The State of Tennessee." Philadelphia: M. Carey & Son, 1818. 9 5/8 x 20 1/2. Engraving. Original outline color. Full margins. Some minor spots. Some pencil marks in margins. Overall, very good condition.

Carey's map of Tennessee issued four years later than that above. $1,500



"Ruiner efter en gammal fastning I Tenessee Staten." [Ruins of an old enclosure in Tennessee]. From Axel Klinckowstrom's Travels. Stockholm, 1824. 6 1/2 x 4 1/4 (neat lines plus margins). Lithograph. Excellent condition.

Baron Axel Leonhard Klinckowstrom was a Swedish aristocrat who spent the years 1818 to 1820 in America as a representative of his government. He wrote a fascinating book about his travels in America and published an atlas of maps and prints to accompany his Bref om de Forente Staterne published in Stockholm in 1824.

The baron provided some original pictures of New York City that are considered original prints after his own paintings (ref. G. Deak's Picturing America, items 310 and 322). This fascinating and early map records how this Swedish explorer recorded what was believed to be an early American Indian site as well as being considered for an industrial site enhanced by strong flowing confluence of Duck River and Little Duck River in this age of water power. Now an historical site, it is believed to date to the Middle Woodlands culture of 80 to 500 A.D. The site is in Coffee County near the town of Manchester, Tennessee. $275



Hinton: Kentucky & Tennessee
"Map of the States of Kentucky and Tennessee." From John H. Hinton's The History and Topography of the United States of America. London: I.T. Hinton & Simpkin & Marshall, [1830]-1832. 9 1/2 x 15 1/2 (neatlines) plus complete margins. Steel engraving by Fenner Sears & Co. Fine condition.

A lovely example of a steel engraved map from one of the more popular nineteenth century view and map books, Hinton's History and Topography. This work contained text and numerous illustrations documenting the history and topography of the United States. Hinton used many different artists, all the engravings being made from drawings made on the spot. For their wide coverage, accurate detail, and pleasing appearance, these are amongst the finest small images of early nineteenth century America to be found anywhere. The London edition was the only one with maps of the regions throughout the United States. Elevation is shown using cross-hatching. $425



Kentucky and Tennessee
David H. Burr. "Kentucky and Tennessee." From A New Universal Atlas (1835). New York: Thomas Illman, 1834. 10 1/4 x 12 1/2. Engraving. Full original color. Some mottling in top half. Else, very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of Kentucky and Tennessee by David H. Burr, one of the most important American cartographers of the first part of the nineteenth century. Having studied under Simeon DeWitt, Burr produced the second state atlas issued in the United States, of New York in 1829. He was then appointed to be geographer for the U.S. Post Office and later geographer to the House of Representatives. The map shows each county with a different color and towns and cities are noted throughout. With his access to information from the Post Office, Burr's depiction of the road system is accurate and up-to-date. Burr's maps are scarce and quite desirable. $275



Thomas G. Bradford. "Tennessee & Kentucky." From A Comprehensive Atlas. Geographical, Historical & Commercial. Boston: William D. Ticknor, 1835. 7 3/4 x 10. Engraving. Original outline color. Full margins. Some typical, light spotting. First issue. Overall, very good condition.

A small map of Tennessee and Kentucky published in Boston in 1835 showing the states in the third decade of the nineteenth century. Information shown includes rivers, towns, and some topography. Throughout the early period of the century, Kentucky continually added counties, as the population expanded and developed around the state. This map is very up-to-date in showing this political development, with each county indicated and named. $175




"A New Map of Tennessee with its Roads & Distances . . .." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1849. With insets of the environs of Nashville and Knoxville. 11 1/2 x 15 1/4. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Full original hand color. Time toning throughout. Still attractive and otherwise, very good condition.

For much of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the Mitchell firm dominated American cartography in output and influence. S. Augustus Mitchell Jr.'s maps of the 1860s are probably the best known issues of this firm, but his father's earlier efforts are excellent maps derived from H.S. Tanner's atlas of the 1830s. This fine map of Tennessee shows the state at an interesting period in its history. The map is filled with topographical details, including rivers, towns, and separate coloring for each of the many counties. It is obvious from the quality and attractive appearance of this map why Mitchell's firm became so important. This map is especially interesting in its depiction of the transportation network in the state, including stagecoach roads and railroads. A table at the bottom right lists the steamboat routes from Nashville to Pittsburgh and to New Orleans; an important bit of information in this period of increased immigration and travel in the American mid-west. A fascinating Tennessee document from mid-century. $325



"A New Map of Tennessee with its Roads and Distances from place to place along the Stage & Steam Boat Routes." Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1851. 11 1/4 x 15 3/8. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Full original color. Some paper toning and a few light spots. Overall, very good condition.

A strong and beautifully crafted map of Tennessee from the mid-nineteenth century, published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co. This firm took over the publication of S. Augustus Mitchell's important Universal Atlas in 1850, and they continued to produce up-dated maps that were amongst the best issued in the period. This map shows Tennessee at an important time in its development. The map is filled with myriad topographical details, including rivers, towns, lakes and political borders. This firm's maps are especially known for their depiction of the transportation routes of the states, and this map is no exception. The transportation infrastructure was extremely important at this period of increased immigration and travel in the American mid-west. This information is clearly depicted, including rail lines, steamboat routes, canals and roads. In the lower right are tables showing distances along steamboat routes through the state. Included are two inset maps showing the areas around Nashville and Knoxville. The map has a striking appearance, with warm hand coloring that well compliments the clear presentation. For its fascinating detail and decorative appeal, this is an excellent Tennessee document. $275



J.H. Colton. "Kentucky and Tennessee." New York: J. H. Colton, 1856. 12 3/4 x 15 5/8. Lithograph. Full original hand-coloring. Full margins. Very good condition.

In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of map publishing in America moved from Philadelphia to New York. The Colton publishing firm played a large role in this shift. This map with its fine detail, is a strong example of their successful work. The map presents the counties with contrasting pastel shades, and includes depictions of towns, roads, railroads, rivers, and some topography. This is an attractive map as well as an interesting historical document. $150



"County Map of Kentucky and Tennessee." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr. 1860. 10 3/4 x 13 3/8. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Full margins. Decorative border. Very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases, and it shows Kentucky and Tennessee in the 1860s. Towns, rivers, roads and other topographical information are clearly shown, and the counties are shaded with contrasting pastel colors. A fine decorative border surrounds the map, and the whole effect makes for an attractive mid-nineteenth century map. $125



"Johnson's "Kentucky and Tennessee." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1862. 17 x 24. Lithograph. Full original hand-color. Very good condition. Three vignettes. Barbed wire border.

An attractive map from A. J. Johnson's atlas issued during the Civil War. Johnson, who published out of New York City, was one of the leading cartographic publishers in the latter half of the century, producing popular atlases, geographies and so on. This finely detailed map is an good example of Johnson's work. Townships, towns, roads, rail lines, rivers and lakes are shown throughout. Of particular note is the extensive road and rail network in the states that would be come so important in the forthcoming conflict. The clear presentation of cartographic information and the warm hand coloring make this an attractive as well as interesting historical document. $175



"Johnson's "Kentucky and Tennessee." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1864-65. 17 1/2 x 24 1/4. Lithograph. Full original hand-color. Very good condition. Two vignettes. Strap work border.

An attractive map from A.J. Johnson's atlas issued during the height of the Civil War. Johnson, who published out of New York City, was one of the leading cartographic publishers in the latter half of the century, producing popular atlases, geographies and so on. This finely detailed map is an good example of Johnson's work. Townships, towns, roads, rail lines, rivers and lakes are shown throughout. Of particular note is the extensive road and rail network in the states that would be come so important in the forthcoming conflict. The clear presentation of cartographic information and the warm hand coloring make this an attractive as well as interesting historical document. $150



J.H. Colton. "Kentucky and Tennessee." New York: J.H. Colton, 1866. 15 1/2 x 26 1/4. Lithograph. Full original hand-coloring. Full margins. Very good condition.

In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of map publishing in America moved from Philadelphia to New York. The Colton publishing firm played a large role in this shift. This map, with its fine detail, is a strong example of their successful work. The map presents the counties with contrasting pastel shades, and includes depictions of towns, roads, railroads, rivers, and some topography. This is an attractive map as well as an interesting historical document. $175



"Gray's Atlas Map of Kentucky and Tennessee." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray & Son, ca. 1880. 11 3/4 x 16 1/2. Lithograph. Original color. Full margins. Very good condition.

A nicely detailed map of the state by the Philadelphia firm of O.W. Gray and Son. The firm began its publishing around mid-century and published regional and U.S. atlases up to the 1880s. This map was issued at the time of the American centennial and it is typical of their work. It contains excellent topographical information and good detail on the towns, counties, roads, and railroads in the state. This information and its attractive presentation make it a nice example of American cartography of the period. $125



"Kentucky and Tennessee." Philadelphia: W.M. Bradley & Bro., 1886. 13 x 20 1/2. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A neatly detailed map from the Philadelphia publishing firm of William M. Bradley & Bros. While Philadelphia was no longer the main center of cartographic publishing in North America by the late nineteenth century, many fine maps were still produced there, as is evidenced by this map. Topography, political information, towns, and physical features are all presented precisely and clearly. The transportation network is particularly well delineated. $90



George F. Cram. "Kentucky and Tennessee." Chicago: G.F. Cram & Co., ca. 1889. 9 5/8 x 13 1/4. Lithograph. Outline hand color.

A colorful, detailed map. The George Cram Company was an engraving and publishing firm from Chicago. In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of cartographic publishing was New York City, but in the 1880's this began to shift towards Chicago with the advent of the Rand, McNally and Cram firms. These firms were noted for their efficient output of precise maps filled with useful and up-to-date political and cultural information, and details on roads, towns, railroads, and so forth. $45



"Kentucky & Tennessee." From Gaskell's Atlas of the World. Chicago: Gaskell, 1889. 9 x 12 1/2. Cereograph map with original printed color. Very good condition.

A double sided map from the late nineteenth century that is a good example of the quality of American mapmaking at the time. Done by cereography, or wax engraving, the map is filled with precise, clear and copious details. Shown are towns, road, railroads, rivers, all set against a topographical background and with pastel shades delineated counties. A wonderful map showing these states almost a century and a half ago. $40



Arbuckle Tennesee
"Tennesee." New York: Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, 1889. Ca. 3 x 5. Chromolithograph by Donaldson Brothers. Very good condition.

From a delightful series of maps issued by the Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company. This firm was founded by John and Charles Arbuckle of Pittsburgh, PA. They developed a machine to weigh, fill, seal and label coffee in paper packages, which allowed them to become the largest importer and seller of coffee in the world. Their most famous promotional program involved the issuing of several series of small, colorful trading cards, one of which was included in every package of Arbuckle's Coffee. These series included cards with sports, food, historic scenes, and--one of the most popular--maps. The latter cards included not only a map, but also small illustrations "which portrays the peculiarities of the industry, scenery, etc." of the region depicted. These cards are a delight, containing informative maps as well as wonderful scenes of the area mapped. $65



George F. Cram. "Kentucky and Tennessee." Chicago: G.F. Cram & Co., 1890s. 13 x 20. Wax engraving. Very Good condition.

A colorful, detailed map from the latter part of the nineteenth century. The George Cram Company was an engraving and publishing firm from Chicago. In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of cartographic publishing was Philadelphia and New York City, but in the 1880's this began to shift towards Chicago with the advent of the Rand, McNally and Cram firms. These firms were noted for their efficient output of precise maps filled with useful and up-to-date political and cultural information, and details on roads, towns, and railroads. $120



[Kentucky and Tennessee]. From Rand McNally & Company's Indexed Atlas of the World. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1906. Each map is 12 1/2 x 19. Map of state is divided by east and west. Cerograph. Very good condition.

An early twentieth century map from the Rand, McNally & Co. firm out of Chicago, a company that would shift the center of cartographic publishing from the east coast to the mid-west. Typical of the firm's work, this map has very good detail precisely and neatly exhibited. Topographic and social information, counties, roads, and many more details are neatly illustrated. Also of note, every major railroad line in the state is indicated in red along with a numbered index. Aesthetically and cartographically, it epitomizes the Rand McNally maps of the twentieth century. $75



"Kentucky & Tennessee." New York: C.S. Hammond & Co., 1914. 11 x 18. Chromolithograph. Outline color. Very good condition.

A detailed and very up-to-date map by one of leading American cartographic firms of the early twentieth century. New York had become the center of American map publishing in the middle of the nineteenth century. Towards the end of the century much of the cartographic industry moved to Chicago and other cities, but the Hammond firm kept New York as an important center of map-making. This map is typical of the company's output, with accurate and clearly presented topographical and political detail. $40



[Kentucky and Tennessee]. From Rand McNally & Company's Commercial Atlas of the World. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1920. Map of state is divided by east and west. Each map is 12 1/2 x 19. Two tone cerograph. Very good condition.

An early twentieth century map from the Rand, McNally & Co. firm out of Chicago, a company that would shift the center of cartographic publishing from the east coast to the mid-west. Typical of the firm's work, this map has very good detail precisely and neatly exhibited. Topographic and social information, counties, roads, and many more details are neatly illustrated. Also of note, every major railroad line in the state is indicated in red along with a numbered index. Aesthetically and cartographically, it epitomizes the Rand McNally maps of the twentieth century. $75



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