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Antique Maps of Philadelphia & Environs

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Easburn: Philadelphia
'Benjamin Easburn.' "A Plan of the City of Philadelphia, the Capital of Pennsylvania, from an Actual Survey by Benjamin Easburn, Surveyor General; 1776." With inset; Joshua Fisher, "A Chart of Delaware Bay and River." London: Andrew Dury, 4th November, 1776. 19 1/2 x 26 1/4. Engraving by P. André. Water color by hand to Windmill Island and inset map. Very good condition.

The turbulent events leading to the American Revolution created a surge in demand for detailed information of America. No location was of greater interest than Philadelphia, the second largest city in the British Empire and the center of the political storm in the colonies. This map of Philadelphia was issued just four months after the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

It was based by the publisher, Andrew Dury, on a 1762 map drawn by the then Surveyor-General of Pennsylvania, Nicholas Scull. That map included in the upper left corner two insets of earlier maps of the city, one being by Benjamin Eastburn (here spelled "Easburn"), who had preceded Scull as Surveyor-General, but was dead over three decades before this map was issued. It appears Dury mistook the author of one of the insets for the author of the entire map. In any case, Dury replaced the two insets with a map more relevant to the current events, a chart of the Delaware River and Bay as far as Philadelphia drawn by Thomas Fisher. The map shows the layout of the city along the Delaware River with a western orientation. It extends as far inland as Eighth Street, indicating and naming each major building. Along the waterfront the owner of each wharf is also named. $12,500



Gent Mag: Scull and Heap
Nicholas Scull & George Heap. "A Map of Philadelphia and Parts Adjacent." London: Gentleman's Magazine, February 1777. Second edition. 13 1/2 x 11 1/2. Engraving. Folds as issued. Short repaired tear at bottom. Minor crease in upper left hand corner of map. Else, very good condition. Prints of Philadelphia, 10; Snyder: 16A.

Perhaps the most famous map of Philadelphia, the Scull & Heap map went through many editions beginning in 1752. Originally the map was issued as a promotion piece for Penn's city and province in America, and with that purpose in mind a reduced version was issued in 1753 in the London periodical Gentleman's Magazine. Just over two decades later, Philadelphia became the political center of the turmoil surrounding the American War of Independence, and together with the British occupation, these circumstances created renewed interest in the City of Brotherly Love. The Scull & Heap map was still the best available of Philadelphia, so the publishers of Gentleman's Magazine reissued the map in a slightly updated form in December, 1777.

Holme's grid plan for Philadelphia itself lies at the center of the map, with the open Center Square and the Court House the only indicated features. More information is given of the surrounding regions, where roads, mills, and houses of prominent citizens are shown and named. Of some note is interesting depiction of Germantown, with houses lining both sides of Germantown Pike. As the settlements in New Jersey to the east of Philadelphia had considerably developed over the previous two decades, this version of the map added roads and settlement information there. As the events of 1777 and 1778 unfolded, this widely disseminated map would have provided most of the English public with their only view on the geography of the city, and likewise it provides us with a unique view of the city over two centuries ago. It is a classic piece of Philadelphiana from the Revolutionary War period. $1,200



Faden Scull and Heap
Nicholas Scull & George Heap. "A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia Survey'd by N. Scull and G. Heap." London: William Faden, 1777. Third state. 24 1/2 x 18. Engraving by W. Faden. Some separation at centerfold. Otherwise, very good condition. Framed to museum specifications. Snyder: 47(b); Stevens & Tree: 69(c).

When friction between Britain and the American colonies began to heat up in the 1770s, European interest in the city of Philadelphia--the political center of dissent in America--increased, resulting in a demand of images of the city. This demand was soon met by publishers in England, Germany and France with the reissue of the Scull and Heap map, still the most up-to-date cartographic rendering of Philadelphia available. The first of these reissues, and the rarest, was done by William Faden in 1777. Faden was the leading London mapmaker, having been appointed geographer to the King in 1775. The scrupulous cartographer that he was, he was careful to give credit on his plate to the pioneer American mapmakers, Nicholas Scull and George Heap. On the map the Holme's grid plan for the city is shown situated between the rivers. In addition, numerous outlying 'country seats' are placed and named, with the primitive road system also indicated. Besides this information, Faden did some of his own updating and modifying of his progenitors' map. He took into account the changes in the place names and environs of the city since the middle of the century, and he also moved Heap's elevation of the statehouse from the top to the bottom center of the plate. The result of all this, together with the ample scale and fine engraving of Faden's plate, is a both highly attractive and important map that in its own right became the prototype for other Scull & Heap editions that soon followed. This is the third state of the map, showing the chevaux-de-frises across the river, put there as part of the defense of the city during the War, showing how up-to-date Faden's maps were. $9,500



Nicholas Scull and George Heap. "A Plan of the City and Environs of Philadelphia." Augsburg: Matthew A. Lotter, 1777. 23 1/2 x 18 (neat lines). Margins complete. Line engraving. A few stains around the elevation of the State House and spots and light browning along top margin. Archival backing for strength. Overall appearance and condition is good.

When first issued in 1752, the famous "Scull and Heap" map was intended as a promotion of William Penn's new city on the Delaware. When the events of the American Revolution began to heat up, illustrations of the center of the revolt, Philadelphia, began to be in great demand in Europe. This demand was soon met by publishers in England, Germany and France with the reissue of the Scull and Heap map, still the most up-to-date cartographic rendering of Philadelphia available. One of the most popular of these reissues was published in 1777 by the German cartographer Matthew Lotter, which he copied closely from a William Faden map of the same year. On the map Holme's grid plan for the city is shown, situated between the rivers, and numerous outlying 'country seats' are placed and named, with the primitive road system also indicated. The map was updated from the first edition to take into account the changes in the place names and environs of the city since the middle of the century, and Heap's elevation of the statehouse was moved from the top to the bottom center of the plate. The result of all this is a highly attractive and historic map that shows Philadelphia at the time of the Revolution. $3,600



DesBarres: Pennsylvania
Joseph Frederick Wallet DesBarres. "Pennsylvania" [Delaware River from Wilmington to the Trenton area]. London: The Admiralty, 1777. Prepared for The Atlantic Neptune. Etching. 30 1/2 x 41. Colored with a light wash. Former folds reinforced; backed on archival paper. Sellers & Van Ee, 1323.

After the French & Indian War, the British began the project of mapping their vast, newly acquired lands in North America. The job of coordinating and publishing the surveys fell upon J.F.W. DesBarres, who had commanded the mapping of the coasts of eastern Canada. The resulting atlas, The Atlantic Neptune, was called by A.P. Loring "the first great marine atlas of the eastern seaboard," and Loring quotes Obadiah Rich, who called it "the most splendid collection of charts, plans and views ever published." This is a chart of the upper Delaware River from Wilmington to as far as a ship could safely float, i.e. to Trenton. Information is fairly sparse on the map because the designer was very selective about what to include. An occasional church or meeting house is shown and a few primitive town plans are depicted. Conventional symbols for swamps and waterways are shown for as much as ten miles inland. All copies of this map are characterized by a paucity of information, yet this chart would still serve to guide a ship up this narrow river. The map reflects the best British knowledge of the entrance to Philadelphia at the time of the war. $6,750



Le Rouge: Delaware Bay
Joshua Fisher. "Baye De La Delaware." Paris: George Louis le Rouge, 1778. First state. 18 1/4 x 25. Engraving. Full margins. Strong strike on heavy paper. Excellent condition. Snyder: 265e.

The first chart of the Delaware Bay was made in 1756 by Joshua Fisher, a former hatter from Lewes. It showed the lower part of the bay and was intended to be used as a navigational aid for ships sailing toward Philadelphia. In 1775, Fisher produced an expanded chart that showed the bay and the Delaware River to just beyond Philadelphia. This was the most important map of the bay and river in the eighteenth century, and it went through many different versions, of which this is the first French version. In 1778, the French were allied with the Americans against the British, and much of their assistance took the form of naval support. Therefore it is not surprising that the French would issue their own version of the best available chart of the approaches to Philadelphia. The map is oriented to the west so that Philadelphia lies at the far right, and Cape Henlopen at the far left. Navigational information is copious in the bay, and the main shipping lane is indicated to Philadelphia, with depths indicated along it. A list of Pilots and Masters of Vessels attesting to the accuracy of the chart in included. Reflecting its source, most names appear in English, though Le Rouge has added a number of French translations. A superior chart of the approaches to Philadelphia at the beginning of the American Revolution. $2,600



J. Simons. "Map of the City of Philadelphia." Philadelphia: P. J. Gray, 1833. Engraving. 12 3/4 x 13 7/8 (neatlines). With folds as issued. Frontispiece map from P.J. Gray's Philadelphia As It Is, and Citizens Advertising Directory: Containing A General Description of The City and Environs, List of Officers, Public Institutions, and Other Useful Information; For the Convenience of Citizens, as A book of Reference, and A Guide to Visitors. With A new Map of the City. Philadelphia, 1833. Fragile and printed on onionskin.

"Strangers Guide" books gave a great amount of information about services and locations in this large and growing city. The map shows a wealth of information about Philadelphia in the 1830s. Shaded areas on the map indicate where the city has been developed. The old waterworks is no longer at Center Square because it had moved out and up to Fairmount. Seven market sheds are drawn on High Street which became "Market." Wards are delineated in an era when Southwark, Northern Liberties, Moyamensing, Passyunk and Spring Garden had more autonomy before consolidation in 1854. An exceptionally detailed map of the city. $375



Simons: Phialdelphia 1834
J. Simons. "Map of the City of Philadelphia." Philadelphia: C.P. Fessenden, 1834. Engraving. 13 1/2 x 14 (neatlines) plus margins. With folds as issued. Map has been professionally conserved. Frontispiece map for The Stranger's Guide to the City of Philadelphia.

This map is from an exquisite stranger's guide book. The publication gave a great amount of information about services and locations in this large and growing city. The maps shows a wealth of information about Philadelphia in the 1830s. Shaded areas on the map indicate where the city has been developed. The old waterworks is no longer at Center Square because it had moved out and up to Fairmount. Wards are delineated in an era when Southwark, Northern Liberties, Moyamensing, Passyunk, and Spring Garden had more autonomy before consolidation in the 1850s. An exceptionally detailed map of the city. $600



"Plan of the West-Philadelphia Rail-Road." Drawn by "H.R. Campbell Engr." Philadelphia: Lehman & Duval, 1835. Lithographed by G. Kramm. 6 x 21 3/4 (neat lines) plus margins. Fine, clear copy.

An unusual and early map of the "West Philadelphia Rail-Road" and the "Columbia and Philadelphia Railroad" when they were separate and providing transportation out of the city. The former ran along Market Street and followed the Philadelphia and Lancaster Turnpike known as Lancaster Avenue or Route 30 today. It shows properties in the town of Athens, which is now Ardmore. The other line proceeds north out of the city, around Fairmount and crosses the Schuylkill to the Inclined Plain then runs north and west in a loop meeting the Old Lancaster Road then the Manyunk Road to join with the other railroad at Athens. Names of many obscure sites and property owners are on this map. $475



Mitchell: Philadelphia 1846
Henry S. Tanner. "Philadelphia." Philadelphia: S.A. Mitchell, Sr., 1846. 15 3/4 x 12 1/2. Lithographic transfer from copper engraving. Original hand color. Time toning at margins, else, very good condition.

A crisp, detailed map of the city of Philadelphia by the great American cartographer, Henry Schenck Tanner and published by Samuel Augustus Mitchell, Sr., one the leading cartographic publisher of the period. Beginning in 1819, Tanner published his American Atlas, which was a huge success. This inspired Tanner to produce his Universal Atlas, of more manageable size, which contained fine maps of each state and a number of cities. These maps were purchased by S. Augustus Mitchell and reissued in his editions of Tanner's atlas. Mitchell was born in Connecticut where he engaged in teaching. Upon the discovery that geography texts were inadequate, he wrote his own and in 1829-30 moved to Philadelphia, then the leading publishing center in the United States. He acquired the stock and plates of Anthony Findley's publishing company and improved on those copper plate maps. In 1846, with the issuing of his New Universal Atlas, Mitchell began using the new technique of stone lithography. This map is from that atlas and shows the Townships, Districts and Wards in his not yet consolidated home city as they existed between March 1836 and February 1844. Philadelphia is shown from Kensington to Southwark and Moyamensing, and from the Delaware to just into West Philadelphia. The north-south running streets west of Penn Square are identified as Schuylkill Front to Eighth Streets; these streets were later re-named counting from the Delaware. Another interesting aspect of this map is that the developed portions of the city have been shaded. This allows one to see the extent of the inhabited areas of the city at the time. Tanner's maps are always noted for their focus on transportation, and this map is no exception. It shows early rail line routes, canals, and indicates the ferry lines on the Delaware. An inset in the lower left gives a key to the city wards and an index of 125 sites is given on the right of the map. This map was republished in several editions by other publishers and provided more readers with more information about Philadelphia than any other map of the period. Besides its fascinating detail, the map is most attractive, with its striking design enhanced by strong hand color. Overall, a most desirable map of the city. $350



"Map of the Vicinity of Philadelphia." C.K. Stone & A. Pomeroy, 1860. 65 x 63. Lithograph with hand color mounted onto linen and then varnished. Varnished has oxidized and the map surface has acquired a light brown patina, as to be expected. However, map is clean and bright. Original rollers attached.

Area shown: Philadelphia County, Delaware County, eastern Chester County, Montgomery and Bucks Counties, northern part of state of Delaware, part of Burlington County, part of Gloucester County and part of Trenton. Inset maps: Philadelphia, Norristown, Conshohocken, Barren Hill, Jenkintown, Plymouth, Hatborough, Springmill, Skippackville, Pottstown.

This large, separately issued map of the area of Philadelphia, western suburbs and southern New Jersey is in surprisingly good condition. As a piece of Philadelphia history, the map stands as an early example of the fully incorporated city, with boundaries extending to its final state. Detail throughout the map is quite amazing, showing the names of specific landowners throughout the large land area as well as roads and landmarks. Also, there are various inset maps of towns in the area which are depicted in great detail. A fascinating and impressive separately-issued map for those with interest in the greater Philadelphia area. $1,400



"Map of the Vicinity of Philadelphia." C.K. Stone & A. Pomeroy, 1860. 65 x 63. Lithograph with hand color mounted onto linen and then varnished. One five and one two inch tears in upper right hand portion of map; not repaired. Minor water stain at top of map and slight fraying of edges of map top left hand side. Numerous old patches on back, as to be expected. However, map is clean and bright. Original rollers attached.

Area shown: Philadelphia County, Delaware County, southern Chester, Montgomery and Bucks Counties, northern Delaware, Camden County, Salem County, Burlington County. Inset maps: Philadelphia, Trenton, Burlington, Mount Holly, Camden, Bordentown and other numerous small towns in New Jersey.

Another map by Stone & Pomeroy with a different focus and set of inset maps. $1,400



John Reed. "To the Honourable House of Representatives of the Freemen of Pennsylvania this Map of the City and Liberties of Philadelphia With the Catalogue of Purchass is Humbly Dedicated by their most Obedient Humble Servant John Reed." Philadelphia: Charles L. Warner, [1774]-1870. Facsimile edition. Separately issued map, dissected into 20 sections and mounted onto linen for folding. 29 1/2 x 58 1/2. Lithograph by Worley & Bracher. Printed by Fred Bourquin. Very good condition. Snyder: 41b.

In 1774 John Reed published his detailed map of Philadelphia and its surrounding "Liberties" to confront the powers of the Penn family which he claimed had neglected the original grants of land to his family. Reed issued the map to illustrate a small book which he published to forward his claim, and as such it included detailed information about the land grants in the liberties. The resulting huge map was engraved on three plates by James Smither. The suit failed to gain him any land, but Reed did provide us with a remarkable document. The map shows information on the actual lay-out of the city at the time, and of the grants in the liberties, details not shown well on other maps of the period which tended to be more schematic, following Holme's projected grid plan. Reed's large, separately issued map is extremely rare, but fortunately there are a number of full size facsimiles, including this excellent lithograph issued in 1870. It provides us with a precious and detailed look at Philadelphia just before the American Revolution. $1,100



Mitchell: Philadelphia 1873
S. Augustus Mitchell Jr. "Plan of Philadelphia." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell Jr. 1873. 11 x 12 3/4. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Full margins. Decorative border.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases. The map depicts and names streets, rail lines, and major buildings. Each ward is colored in a contrasting pastel shade. This map was republished in several editions and it provided more readers with information about Philadelphia than any other map of the period. A fine decorative border surrounds the map; an attractive mid-nineteenth century map. $250



Gray Philadelphia
"Philadelphia." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray & Son, 1875. 14 3/4 x 12. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition. Denver.

A handsome and detailed map of Philadelphia by O.W. Gray. Gray began issuing atlases around mid-century and continued, first on his own and later as O.W. Gray & Son to the 1880s. This map shows Philadelphia about a decade after the end of the Civil War, when Philadelphia was an impressive urban center, the fourth largest city in the world. Most of its important structures were located in what is now known as "Center City." This clear map focuses on that section, extending from Norris to Morris, and from the eastern bank of the Delaware to the western bank of the Schuylkill. The map depicts and names streets, rail lines, and major buildings. Each ward is colored in a contrasting, light pastel shade. $275



"Philadelphia." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray & Son, 1876.15 1/4 x 24 1/. Lithograph. Original hand color. Light waterstain in lower left margin. Else, very good condition. Denver.

Another map of Philadelphia by O.W. Gray & Son, but this one showing Philadelphia at the time of the Centennial Exposition, with much of the interest in the map devoted to information about the World's Fair. The Centennial grounds are shown in Fairmount Park on the west side of the Schuylkill. The map also gives much detail to Center City, the Northeast, and Camden connected by ferry boats. Other information shows the railroads which were bringing over a million people to the Centennial grounds while influencing a burgeoning West Philadelphia The map depicts and names streets, rail lines, and major buildings. Each ward is colored in a contrasting, light pastel shade. $325



G[riffith] M[organ] Hopkins. Atlas of Philadelphia and environs: from official records, private plans, and actual surveys based upon plans deposited in the Department of Surveys surveyed & published under the direction of G.M. Hopkins, C.E., 320 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, 1877. F. Bourquin Steam Lithographic Press, 31 South 6th Street, Philadelphia. Folio. Worn boards and spine; front hinge broken. Interior clean and complete (pp. 1-25, 28, 33-87; 50 colored maps). Includes historical sketch of Montgomery County. Moak, Atlases of Pennsylvania: 407.

Areas covered in this atlas:



"New Map of Philadelphia and Vicinity." Philadelphia: J.L. Smith, 1891. Separately issued, folding map in two sheets. Each sheet ca 26 x 22. Lithograph. Original color highlights. Folding into original cloth cover. Very good condition.

The first edition of Smith's large, two-sheet folding map of Philadelphia and environs. It covers the area from Philadelphia and as as far north as North Wales, to the east as far as Moorestown, and to the west just beyond Downingtown. Major streets and some buildings are shown in the city. Extensive information is given for the surrounding area, including roads, rivers, rail lines, mills, hotels, meeting houses, and myriad other geographic details. $475



"Official Maps of the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, approaches to the City of Philadelphia. U. S. Coast and Geodetic Surveys, 1891." Published April 1891 by T. C. Mendenhall, Superintendent United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. Each folding map measures 50 7/8 x 25 3/4, and is attached to a muslin-covered board 14 x 10. The boards are worn and have separated, but the maps are in good condition with expected wear, containing notes by a contemporary hand. Maps show Latitude and Longitude, Buoys, Soundings, Tides and Lights along the rivers. Front board gilt-titled, with addition "Wm W. Harkness, No. 938 Drexel Building."

Thomas Corwin Mendenhall (1829-1924), became a physics professor both in his native Ohio and as a visiting professor in Tokyo. Returning to Ohio in 1881, he devised a system of weather signals for display on railroad trains. Working for the U.S. Army Signal Corps after 1884, he made observations of lightning, investigated methods for determining ground temperatures, and established stations in the United States for the systematic observation of earthquake phenomena. Becoming head of the Coast and Geodetic Survey in 1889, he advocated for the replacement in the US of English measurements with the metric system and defined the exact boundary between Alaska and Canada. He was president of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, retired with his wife to a long sojourn in Europe, and returned to Ohio, serving as a trustee of Ohio State University.

Born in 1829 and with offices in the Drexel Building at the S.E. corner of 5th & Chestnut Streets, William W. Harkness was a Philadelphia businessman, whose endeavors were listed in the 1890 Philadelphia directory as "land, timber, oil." $425



"New Map of Philadelphia and Vicinity." Separately issued, folding map in two sheets. Philadelphia: J.L. Smith, 1894. Each sheet ca. 26 x 22. Lithograph. Original color highlights. Folding into original cloth cover. Very good condition.

A large folding map of Philadelphia and the regions to the north as far as North Wales, to the east as far as Moorestown, N.J. and to the west just beyond Downingtown. Major streets and some buildings are shown in the city. Extensive information is given for the surrounding area, including roads, rivers, rail lines, mills, hotels, meeting houses and myriad other geographic details. $375



E. P. Noll. "Noll's New Road, Driving and Bicycle Map of Philadelphia and Surrounding Country." Philadelphia: E.P. Noll & Co., 1896. Cereograph printed in two colors. 30 1/4 x 28 1/4. Folded into original red cloth case with blind stamping and imprint in gold. With a number of brown spots and some minor tears at folds. Otherwise, very good condition.

An impressively detailed transportation map that shows Philadelphia and vicinity when newly paved roads were in demand because bicyclists and drivers demanded smoother surfaces. The cycling roads are highlighted by the use of red ink, and this map exhibits the extensive network of such roads in the Delaware Valley. Also shown are railroads, turnpikes, canals, churches, hotels, mills, schools, post offices and other interesting details. The small size of the booklet into which the map folds would have made this a practical item for a cyclist to carry. $275



"Philadelphia." From Indexed Atlas Of The World. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., [1898]-1899. 19 x 26. Cerograph. Full original color. Very good condition.

A late nineteenth century map from the early days of the Rand, McNally & Co. firm out of Chicago, a company that would shift the center of cartographic publishing from the east coast to the mid-west. Typical of the work from the firm, this map has very good detail, precisely and neatly exhibited. One inset shows some of the Pennsylvania and New Jersey railroad stations/communities around Philadelphia, and another lists the Delaware River piers' railroad connections, keyed to the pier numbers. Aesthetically and cartographically a foreshadow of the maps of the twentieth century. $225


[Elvino V. Smith?]. [Map of Philadelphia, Camden and Vicinity with emphasis on the western and northwestern suburbs of Philadelphia.] Philadelphia: Smith?, n.d. but circa 1905. Two sections measuring (left) 27 1/2 x 21 1/2 (full sheet) and (right) 27 1/4 x 23 1/2 (full sheet) cut within neatlines and title information. The two parts are attached to an art buckram case stamped in gold reading "Smith's Map of Philadelphia and Vicinity." Separately issued. Backed on linen. Excellent condition.

A large map of Philadelphia and the regions to the northwest as far out as 34 miles (Warwick), to the west to 30 miles (Kennett Square), to the north east 22 miles (Newtown), and east 14 miles (to Beverly and Moorestown, New Jersey). Major streets are shown in the city and suburbs. Extensive information is given for the surrounding area. The sheet to the right is cut down to fit uniformly with the companion map. Elvino Victor Smith is listed in various atlas directories such as those by LeGear and Moak as flourishing from 1905-31. $350



E. P. Noll. "Noll's New Automobile Road, Driving and Bicycle Map of Philadelphia and Surrounding Country." Philadelphia: Noll, 1908. Lithograph (colored). 31 x 31 1/2 (neatlines) plus full margins. Folded into original green cloth case with blind stamping and imprint in gold. Linen backing is splitting at folds and corners, as expected, but map features are clear and readable.

A later edition of the Noll driving map of Philadelphia (cf. above). The impressive road system in the Delaware Valley paved the way (so to speak) for the newly invented and mass produced automobile (added since the earlier version). The automobile roads are dramatically shown with heavy blue lines. Also shown are "common roads," turnpikes, canals, and railroads. Lighter lines and text shows community divisions, buildings, streams, and much more. $375



E. P. Noll. "Noll's New Automobile Road, and Driving Map of Philadelphia and Surrounding Country." Philadelphia: E.P. Noll & Co., 1920. 42 1/2 x 26. Cerograph (colored). Folded into original red cloth case with blind stamping and imprint in gold. Linen backing is splitting at folds and corners, as expected, but map features are clear and readable.

This dramatic transportation map shows Philadelphia and vicinity when newly paved roads were in demand. Earlier Noll maps had shown bicycle roads because those riders demanded smoother surfaces. The better surfaces paved the way (so to speak) for the newly invented and mass produced automobile. The automobile roads are dramatically shown with heavy red lines, and the title designates them as "good" roads. Also shown are "common roads," turnpikes, canals, and railroads. Lighter lines and text shows community divisions, buildings, streams, and much more. $375



Elvino V. Smith. "Map of Philadelphia, Camden and Vicinity . . . by Elvino V. Smith, 512-514 Walnut Street." Credit reads, "Engraved by Albert Volk, Philadelphia." Philadelphia: E.V. Smith, 1921. 55 x 43 1/2. Chromolithograph. Full margins. Backed on linen and joined into 48 rectangles. Some wear along folds as issued. Separately issued. Very good condition.

A very large map of Philadelphia and the regions to the northwest as far as Ambler and Ft. Washington, to the northeast as far as Somerton, to the southwest just beyond Norwood in Delaware County, and to the southeast to Clementon, New Jersey. Major streets are shown in the city and suburbs. Elvino Victor Smith is listed in various atlas directories such as those by LeGear and Moak as flourishing from 1905-31. $650




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