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Antique Maps of Louisiana

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John Melish. "New Orleans and adjacent country." From A Geographical Description of the United States. Philadelphia: J. Melish, 1822. 6 1/2 x 3 7/8. Engraving. Very good condition.

A small map of the region around New Orleans by one of the seminal figures in the history of American cartography. John Melish was the first American publisher to issue exclusively cartographic and geographic items. Born in Scotland and involved in the textile industry, Melish visited the United States several times beginning in 1806, finally deciding to settle there in 1811. Melish had made many notes on his travels about the country and in 1812 he published Travels in the United States of America, which included his first maps and which started him on his cartographic career. Melish came to dominate the industry in this country, and had a huge impact on all subsequent American mapping. Beginning in 1816, Melish issued his Geographical Description, which contained extensive information about the entire United States and surrounding regions. In 1822, Melish issued a considerably expanded edition, which included 12 engraved regional maps of considerable note, including this fine map. This map shows the land a way south of the city to the shore of Lake Pntchartrain and indicates the headquarters for the Battle of New Orleans. $225



Finley: Louisiana  1827
Anthony Finley. "Louisiana." From A New General Atlas. Philadelphia: A. Finley, 1827. 8 5/8 x 11 1/4. Engraving by Young & Delleker. Original hand coloring. A few small stains. Else, very good condition.

In the 1820s, Anthony Finley produced a series of fine atlases in the then leading American cartographic center, Philadelphia. Finley's work is a good example of the quality that American publishers were beginning to obtain in the second decade of the century. Finley was very concerned to depict as up-to-date information as was possible, and thus his map presents an accurate picture of Louisiana in the early 1820s. Most of the development in the state at the time was in the east along the Mississippi. The western part of the state is shown as consisting of two counties, with litttle development. The map is elegantly presented, with crisp and clear engraving and attractive pastel hand shading. Towns, rivers, and political divisions are indicated, and the road system throughout the state is marked. The myriad waterways of the state are well depicted. The hand coloring makes this map as attractive as it is informative. This is a fine map of Louisiana at an early stage of its development as a state. $225



Henry S. Tanner. "A New Map of Louisiana with its Canals, Rail-Roads & Distances from Place to Place along the Stage Roads & Steam Boat Routes." From Tanner's Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: H. S. Tanner, 1833. Engraved by W. Brose. 10 3/4 x 13 3/8. Original hand color. Repaired loss in bottom margin, and some spots in bottom and left margins, none affecting image. Else, very good condition.

A superior, detailed map of Louisiana by the great American cartographer, Henry Schenck Tanner. In 1816, Henry, his brother Benjamin, John Vallance and Francis Kearny formed an engraving firm in Philadelphia. Having had experience at map engraving through his work with John Melish, Tanner conceived of the idea of compiling and publishing an American Atlas, which was begun in 1819 by Tanner, Vallance, Kearny & Co. Soon Tanner took over the project on his own, and thus began his career as cartographic publisher. The American Atlas was a huge success, and this inspired Tanner to produce his Universal Atlas, of more manageable size. This atlas contained excellent maps of each state, focusing on the transportation network, including roads, railroads and canals. All details are clearly presented, and these include towns, rivers, mountains, political boundaries and the transportation information. The maps were later purchased by S. Augustus Mitchell, and then Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., but it is these early Tanner editions which are the rarest and most important. This map of Louisiana is typical of the maps, and it shows the state at an interesting stage of its history. An inset map of New Orleans at the top right shows why it is nicknamed the Crescent City and includes a key to city sites; a table of steamboat routes is shown at top left. $275



Burr Louisiana
David H. Burr. "Louisiana." From A New Universal Atlas (1835). New York: Thomas Illman, 1834. 10 1/4 x 12 3/4. Engraving by Illman & Co. Full original color. Some spots and light stains, mostly in marings. Very good condition. Denver.

An excellent map of Louisiana by David H. Burr, one of the most important American cartographers of the first part of the nineteenth century. Having studied under Simeon DeWitt, Burr produced the second state atlas issued in the United States, of New York in 1829. He was then appointed to be geographer for the U.S. Post Office and later geographer to the House of Representatives. The map shows each county with a different color and towns and cities are noted throughout. With his access to information from the Post Office, Burr's depiction of the road system is accurate and up-to-date. Burr's maps are scarce and quite desirable. $325



Thomas G. Bradford Louisiana Arkansas
Thomas G. Bradford. "Louisiana and part of Arkansas." From A Comprehensive Atlas. Geographical, Historical & Commercial. Boston: Wm. B. Ticknor, 1835. 10 1/4 x 7 5/8. Engraving. Original outline color. Some light spotting. Otherwise, very good condition.

A nice map from Boston publisher and cartographer, Thomas G. Bradford. Issued in 1835, Bradford's Atlas contained maps of the different United States and other parts of the world, based on the most up-to-date information available at the time. Towns, rivers, lakes, and some orography are depicted. Counties are named and indicated with original outline color. Because Bradford continued to update his maps as he issued them in different volumes, this political information is very interesting for historic purposes. This map is interesting as it shows the states at an early stage in their development. This is a good representation of American cartography in the fourth decade of the nineteenth century and an interesting document of regional history. $85



Thomas G. Bradford Louisiana
Thomas G. Bradford. "Louisiana." From A Universal Illustrated Atlas. Boston; Charles D. Strong., [1838] - 1842. 11 3/8 x 14. Engraving by G.W. Boynton. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A finely engraved map by Thomas G. Bradford, a Boston map publisher, showing Louisiana at the beginning of the fourth decade of the nineteenth century. The map was original drawn and issued by Thomas Bradford in 1838 and this example was published five years later. Detail is very good, showing towns, counties, and the myriad rivers throughout the state. This map shows the state during a period of considerable development, especially in the southeastern part and along the Mississippi. The map is impressive in its detail, which includes some of the early roads and a railroad running into New Orleans from the north. The whole is attractively presented with original hand coloring, and precise engraving. $325



Carey & Hart: Louisiana
Henry S. Tanner. "A New Map of Louisiana with its Canals, Roads & Distances from place to place, along the Stage & Steam Boat Routes." From Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: Carey & Hart, [1839]-1843. 10 3/4 x 13 1/4. Engraving by W. Brose. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A strong and beautifully crafted map of Louisiana from the nineteenth century by the great American cartographer, Henry Schenck Tanner. In 1816, Henry, his brother Benjamin, John Vallance and Francis Kearny formed an engraving firm in Philadelphia. Having had experience at map engraving through his work with John Melish, Tanner conceived of the idea of compiling and publishing an American Atlas, which was begun in 1819 by Tanner, Vallance, Kearny & Co. Soon Tanner took over the project on his own, and thus began his career as cartographic publisher. The American Atlas was a huge success, and this inspired Tanner to produce his Universal Atlas, of more manageable size. This atlas contained excellent maps of each state, focusing on the transportation network, including roads, railroads and canals. This map is a fine example of that atlas. It is filled with myriad topographical details, including rivers, bayous, marshes, towns, lakes and parish borders. Tanner's maps are especially known for their depiction of the transportation routes of the states, and this map is no exception. The transportation infrastructure was extremely important at this period of increased immigration and travel in the American south. This information is clearly depicted, including railroads, canals and roads. Along the left side are tables showing distances along steamboat routes on the Mississippi. Also included is an inset map showing New Orleans, with a key to sites in the city. $275



S. Augustus Mitchell Louisiana
S. Augustus Mitchell. "State of Louisiana." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1848. 11 1/2 x 14 1/4. With an inset of New Orleans. Folio. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Original hand-coloring. Full margins. Very good condition.

For much of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the Mitchell firm dominated American cartography in output and influence. S. Augustus Mitchell Jr.'s maps of the 1860s are probably the best known issues of this firm, but his father's earlier efforts are excellent maps derived from H.S. Tanner's atlas of the 1830s. This map of Louisiana is a good example of this work. Topographical information, including towns, rivers, roads canals and so on, is profuse and clearly shown, and the counties are shaded with contrasting pastel colors. Since steamboats were the most glamorous and comfortable way to travel, the map includes the distances between major cities. It is obvious from the quality and attractive appearance of this map why Mitchell's firm became so important. A fine early American cartographic document of the state. This map is clearly based on the earlier map in Tanner's atlas, but with up-to-date political information and boundaries. $250



Thomas Cowperthwait. "A New Map of Louisiana with its Canals, Roads & Distances from place to place along the Stage & Steam Boat Routes." Philadelphia: Thomas Cowperthwait & Co., 1850. 11 1/2 x 14 3/8. Lithographic transfer from engraved plate. Full original color. Full margins. Very good condition.

A strong and beautifully crafted map of Louisiana from the mid-nineteenth century, published by Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co. This firm took over the publication of S. Augustus Mitchell's important Universal Atlas in 1850, and they continued to produce up-dated maps that were amongst the best issued in the period. This map shows Louisiana as a well developed state at mid-century. It is filled with myriad topographical details, including rivers, bayous, marshes, towns, lakes and parish borders. This firm's maps are especially known for their depiction of the transportation routes of the states, and this map is no exception. The transportation infrastructure was extremely important at this period of increased immigration and travel in the American south. This information is clearly depicted, including railroads, canals and roads. Along the left side are tables showing distances along steamboat routes on the Mississippi. Also included is an inset map showing New Orleans, with a key to sites in the city. The map has a rather striking appearance, with warm hand coloring, that well compliments the clear presentation. For its fascinating detail and decorative appeal, this is an excellent Louisiana document. $225



Thomas Cowperthwait. "A New Map of Louisiana with its Canals Roads & Distances from place to place, along the Stage & Steam Boat Routes." Philadelphia: Thomas Cowperthwait & Co., 1851. Lithograph. Original hand color. 11 1/2 x 14 1/4. Small spot over Greensburg.

Another example of Cowperthwait's fine map of Louisiana, published a year later. $200



Colton: Louisiana 1855
J.H. Colton & Co. "Louisiana." New York: J.H. Colton & Co., 1855. 12 3/4 x 16. Lithograph. Full original hand color. Very good condition.

In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of map publishing in America moved from Philadelphia to New York. The Colton publishing firm played a large role in this shift. This map of Louisiana, with its fine detail, is a strong example of their successful work. The map presents the counties with contrasting pastel shades, and includes depictions of towns, roads, railroads, rivers, and some topography. Each feature is labeled neatly, and the information given extends beyond the borders of the state. This is an attractive map as well as an interesting historical document. $125



Charles Desilver. "A New Map of Louisiana with its Canals, Roads & Distances from place to place along the Stage & Steam Boat Routes." Philadelphia: Charles Desilver, 1856. 11 5/8 x 14 1/4. With an inset of New Orleans. Full original hand color. Very good condition. $165



Augustus Mitchell Arkansas
S. Augustus Mitchell. "Map of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1860. 13 1/4 x 10 5/8. Lithograph. Full original hand color. Slight discoloration in margins.

An interesting multi-state map by S. Augustus Mitchell showing Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas. Most interesting in this depiction of the southern states along the flow of the Mississippi River is the beginning foundation for railroads criss-crossing the land and making important stops in cities along the river such as Memphis, Helena, and Vicksburg, all the way down to the port city of New Orleans. Beautiful hand coloration in this map, with counties depicted in contrasting pastel shades, and a nice decorative border. $70



Johnson Ward Arkansas Mississippi Louisiana
Johnson and Ward. "Johnson's Arkansas Mississippi and Louisiana." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1862. 24 x 17. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

An attractive and large map of these southern states from A. J. Johnson's atlas issued one year following the start of the Civil War. Johnson, who published out of New York City, was one of the leading cartographic publishers in the latter half of the century, producing popular atlases, geographies and so on. This finely detailed map is an good example of Johnson's work. Townships, towns, roads, rail lines, rivers and lakes are shown throughout. Of particular note is the extensive road and rail network connecting these states to ports along the Mississippi. The clear presentation of cartographic information and the warm hand coloring make this an attractive as well as interesting historical document. $75



J.H. Colton & Co. "Colton's Louisiana." New York: G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co., 1865. 12 3/4 x 15 3/4. Lithograph. Full original hand color. Very good condition.

Another example of the fine map of Louisiana by Colton shown above, but with maps of Louisville and New Orleans on reverse. $125



S. Augustus Mitchell Jr. "Plan of New Orleans." From Mitchell's New General Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell Jr., 1867. 9 1/4 x 10 7/8. Lithograph. Full original hand color. Full margins. Very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases. The map depicts and names streets, rail lines, and major buildings. The different areas of the city are colored contrasting pastel shades. This map would have provided more readers with good information about New Orleans in this period. A fine decorative border surrounds the map, and the whole effect makes for an attractive mid-nineteenth century map. $75



S. Augustus Mitchell Jr. Arkansas Mississippi Louisiana
S. Augustus Mitchell Jr. "County Map of the States of Arkansas Mississippi and Louisiana." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell Jr., 1867. 20 7/8 x 13 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand color. Slight discoloration in left and right margins.

A new multi-state atlas map of Arkansas, Mississippi and Louisiana from the Mitchell publishing company in Philadelphia. For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell, Sr. dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases shortly after the Civil War. Towns, rivers, roads and other topographical information are clearly shown, and the counties are shaded with contrasting pastel colors. A fine decorative border surrounds the map, and the whole effect makes for an attractive and historically interesting mid-nineteenth century map. $75



J.H. Colton & Co. "Colton's Louisiana." New York: G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co., 1875. 12 3/4 x 15 3/4. Lithograph. Full original hand color. Very good condition.

Another example of the fine map of Louisiana by Colton shown above. Map of Mississippi on reverse. $110



New Orleans
"Plan of New Orleans." From Mitchell's New General Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr. 1880. 9 1/4 x 11. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Full margins. Decorative border. Very good condition. Denver.

A slightly later example of Mitchell's classic map of New Orleans. $75



Bradley Arkansas Mississippi Louisiana
W.M. Bradley. "County Map of the States of Arkansas Mississippi and Louisiana." Philadelphia: W.M. Bradley & Bros., 1886. 21 1/4 x 13 7/8. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

A neatly detailed map from the Philadelphia publishing firm of William M. Bradley & Bros. While Philadelphia was no longer the main center of cartographic publishing in North America by the late nineteenth century, many fine maps were still produced there, as is evidenced by this map. Topography, political information, towns, and physical features are all presented precisely and clearly. The development of these southern states is clearly shown through railroads and major ports of call along the Mississippi River and gulf coast providing the transportation nexus by which this development progressed. $65



Arbuckle Louisiana
"Louisiana." New York: Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company, 1889. Ca. 3 x 5. Chromolithograph by Donaldson Brothers. Very good condition.

From a delightful series of maps issued by the Arbuckle Bros. Coffee Company. This firm was founded by John and Charles Arbuckle of Pittsburgh, PA. They developed a machine to weigh, fill, seal and label coffee in paper packages, which allowed them to become the largest importer and seller of coffee in the world. Their most famous promotional program involved the issuing of several series of small, colorful trading cards, one of which was included in every package of Arbuckle's Coffee. These series included cards with sports, food, historic scenes, and--one of the most popular--maps. The latter cards included not only a map, but also small illustrations "which portrays the peculiarities of the industry, scenery, etc." of the region depicted. These cards are a delight, containing informative maps as well as wonderful scenes of the area mapped. $60



Hunt Eaton Arkansas Mississippi Louisiana
Hunt & Eaton. "Arkansas, Mississippi, and Louisiana." New York: Hunt & Eaton, 1890s. 11 1/4 x 9 3/8. Engraving by Fisk & Co. Very good condition. $25



Cram: Louisiana 1891
"Louisiana." Chicago: George F. Cram, 1891. 12 1/2 x 10. Small scuffed area near Shreveport, else very good condition. $40



Rand McNally New Orleans
"Map of New Orleans." From Rand, McNally & Co.'s Indexed Atlas of the World. 1892. 18 7/8 x 12 1/4. Cerograph. A few archivally repaired tears in margins. Else, very good condition. $65



Rand McNally Louisiana
"Louisiana" From Rand, McNally & Co.'s Atlas of the World, Chicago, 1895. 12 1/2 x 9 1/4 . Cerograph. Very good condition.

"Map of the Main Portion of New Orleans" on reverse. $25



Cram New Orleans
"New Orleans." Cram, ca. 1900. 11 3/8 x 9 3/8. Cerograph. Very good condition. $40



Louisiana
"Louisiana." Chicago: Geographical Publishing Co., ca. 1900. 14 3/4 x 20 7/8. Cerograph. Excellent condition. $55



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