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Antique Maps of Georgia

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Lucas: Georgia
Fielding Lucas, Jr. "Georgia." From A New and Elegant General Atlas Containing Maps of each of the United States. Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1816. 10 3/4 x 8 3/8. Folio. Engravings. Full original hand color. Large margins. Short tear in the right margin at bottom extending from the platemark to the right, but not to the edge of the sheet; three short tears in left side bottom margin, one of which extends beyond the platemark and through the border ending just inside the mapped area between the O and R of Florida; else good condition and overall fine appearance.

A delightful map by Baltimore cartographer, Fielding Lucas, Jr. (1781-1854). Lucas appears to have become involved in the publishing and book trade while a resident of Philadelphia from 1798 to 1804, when he moved to Baltimore. In 1807 Lucas joined Conrad, Lucas & Co., and then in 1810 he set up his own business at 138 Market Street. There Lucas first got involved in cartographic publishing with his New and Elegant General Atlas of 1816. In the second decade of the nineteenth century, through his Philadelphia contacts, Lucas was one of the major contributors to Carey & Lea's atlas of 1823. Concurrently with this involvement, Lucas brought out his own General Atlas, containing 104 maps of all parts of the world. Lucas, during his 50 years of residence in Baltimore, established himself as a prominent citizen of that city, serving as President of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, President of the Board of School Commissioners, and as President of the Second Branch of the City Council. But it is for his important role in early American cartography that Lucas is best remembered. $650



Hinton: Alabama/Georgia
"Map of the States of Alabama and Georgia." From John H. Hinton's The History and Topography of the United States of America. London: I.T. Hinton & Simpkin & Marshall, [1830]-1832. 15 5/8 x 10. Steel engraving by Fenner Sears & Co. Fine condition.

A lovely example of a steel engraving from one of the more popular nineteenth century view and map books, Hinton's History and Topography. This work contained text and numerous illustrations documenting the history and topography of the United States. Hinton used many different artists, all the engravings being made from drawings made on the spot. For their wide coverage, accurate detail, and pleasing appearance, these are amongst the finest small images of early nineteenth century America to be found anywhere. The London edition was the only one with maps of the regions throughout the United States. OUT ON APPROVAL JC



Bradford South East
Thomas G. Bradford. "North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia." From A Comprehensive Atlas. Geographical, Historical & Commercial. Boston: Wm. B. Ticknor, 1835. 7 5/8 x 10. Engraving. Original outline color. Some light spotting. Otherwise, very good condition.

A nice map of the American southeast from Boston publisher and cartographer, Thomas G. Bradford (1802-1887). Issued in 1835, Bradford's Atlas contained maps of the different United States and other parts of the world, based on the most up-to-date information available at the time. Towns, rivers, lakes, and some orography are depicted. Counties are named and indicated with original outline color. Because Bradford continued to update his maps as he issued them in different volumes, this political information is very interesting for historic purposes. This is a good representation of American cartography in the fourth decade of the nineteenth century and an interesting document of regional history. $135



Mitchell Georgia
"A New Map of Georgia with its Roads & Distances." From A New Universal Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, 1848. 13 3/4 x 11 1/2. Lithograph transfer from engraved plate. Full original hand color. With typical time toning and color oxidation. Otherwise, very good condition.

A fine map of Georgia from the mid-nineteenth century, showing the state at an interesting period in its history. The map is filled with myriad topographical details, including rivers, towns, lakes and political borders. For much of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the Mitchell firm dominated American cartography in output and influence. S. Augustus Mitchell Jr.'s maps of the 1860s are probably the best known issues of this firm, but his father's earlier efforts are excellent maps derived from H.S. Tanner's atlas of the 1830s. It is obvious from the quality and attractive appearance of this map why Mitchell's firm became so important. This map is especially interesting in its depiction of the transportation network in the state, including roads and railroads. A table at the bottom lists the steamboat routes from Savannah to Augusta and from Savannah to Charleston; an important bit of information in this period of increased immigration and travel in the American south. A fascinating Georgia document from mid-century. $325



"Johnson's Georgia and Alabama." New York: Johnson & Browning, 1860. 17 x 24. Lithograph. Full original hand-color. Very good condition. With vignettes of Tuscaloosa Observatory and Rice-Mill on Savannah River.

An attractive map of Alabama and Georgia from A.J. Johnson's atlas issued just at the start of the Civil War. Johnson, who published out of New York City, was one of the leading cartographic publishers in the latter half of the century, producing popular atlases, geographies and so on. This finely detailed map is an good example of Johnson's work. Townships, towns, roads, rail lines, rivers and lakes are shown throughout. Of particular note is the extensive road and rail network in the states that would be come so important in the forthcoming conflict. The clear presentation of cartographic information and the warm hand coloring make this an attractive as well as interesting historical document. $175



"Johnson's Georgia and Alabama." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1862. 17 x 24. Lithograph. Full original hand-color. Very good condition. With vignettes of Tuscaloosa Observatory and Rice-Mill on Savannah River.

Another example of Johnson's fine map. $175



Johnson Alabama/Georgia
"Johnson's Georgia and Alabama." New York: Johnson & Ward, 1864. 15 1/2 x 22. Lithograph. Full original hand-color. Very good condition.

A slightly reduced map of Georgia and Alabama from the Johnson atlas of four years later. This map lacks the two vignettes of the earlier edition, but the information is just as comprehensive. $175



Colton: Georgia
"Colton's Georgia." New York: G.W. & C.B. Colton & Co., 1866. 15 1/2 x 13. Lithograph. Full original hand-coloring. Very good condition.

In the mid-nineteenth century, the center of map publishing in America moved from Philadelphia to New York. The J.H. Colton publishing firm played a large role in this shift. This map of Georgia, with its fine detail, is a strong example of their successful work. The map presents the counties in contrasting pastel shades, and includes depictions of towns, rivers, marshes, and some topography. Of particular interest are the indications of the burgeoning transportation network in the state, with roads and railroads clearly shown. An attractive map as well as a worthwhile historical document. $175



Mitchell Alabama/Georgia
"County Map of Georgia, and Alabama." Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr. 1867+. 10 3/4 x 13 1/4. Lithograph. Original hand coloring. Decorative border. Very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell, Sr. dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases, and it shows Alabama and Georgia in the mid-1860s, shortly after the Civil War. Towns, rivers, roads and other topographical information are clearly shown, and the counties are shaded with contrasting pastel colors. A fine decorative border surrounds the map, and the whole effect makes for an attractive and historically interesting mid-nineteenth century map. $145



Gray Georgia
"Gray's Atlas Map of Georgia." Philadelphia: O.W. Gray, 1873. 14 3/4 x 12 3/8. From Gray's Atlas of the United States. Lithograph. Original hand color. Archivally repaired tears in right margin, not affecting image. Else, very good condition.

A nicely detailed map of Georgia showing counties, towns, canals, roads, railroads & topography by the Philadelphia firm of O.W. Gray and Son. The firm began its publishing around mid-century and published regional and U.S. atlases up to the 1880s. This map is typical of their work, and its attractive presentation and interesting detail make it a nice example of late nineteenth century Philadelphia cartography. $125



Georgia and Alabama
"County Map of the States of Georgia and Alabama." From Mitchell's New General Atlas. Philadelphia: S. Augustus Mitchell, Jr. 1880. 13 1/2 x 21 1/2. Lithograph. Original hand color. Very good condition.

For most of the middle part of the nineteenth century, the firm founded by S. Augustus Mitchell, Sr. dominated American cartography in output and influence. This fine map is from one of his son's atlases, and it shows Alabama and Georgia in 1880. Towns, rivers, roads and other topographical information are clearly shown, and the counties shaded with contrasting pastel shades. This is a larger, updated version of Mitchell's earlier maps of these two states, reflecting the increased development at the time. Of particular interest are the insets of Savannah and Atlanta. $150



[Georgia]. From Rand McNally & Company's Indexed Atlas of the World. Chicago: Rand, McNally & Co., 1906. 29 x 19. Cerograph. Very good condition.

An early twentieth century map from the Rand, McNally & Co. firm out of Chicago, a company that would shift the center of cartographic publishing from the east coast to the mid-west. Typical of the firm's work, this map has very good detail precisely and neatly exhibited. Topographic and social information, counties, roads, and many more details are neatly illustrated. Also of note, every major railroad line in the state is indicated in red along with a numbered index. Aesthetically and cartographically, it epitomizes the Rand McNally maps of the twentieth century. $125



Lloyd Edwin Smith. "Georgia." From the Commercial Atlas of the World. Ed. by Frederick J. Branom. Chicago: Geographical Publishing Company, 1931. Folio. Chromolithograph. $65




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